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  • Caught and sold! Collectors eye Cricket World Cup memorabilia
  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • andCaughtCollectorssold!

Caught and sold! Collectors eye Cricket World Cup memorabilia

Can anyone beat the Aussies? And what pieces of game used memorabilia will emerge as prime investments from the Cricket World Cup? Two questions that the next month or so will help answer.

The Australian cricket team may have lost the Ashes earlier this winter, but when it comes to the one day game, no team has a better pedigree.

Australia will be looking to win the limited overs title for the fourth straight time when the Cricket World Cup begins today.

The competition is taking place in India, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh, a part of the world famed for its love of the game.

But while the Aussies have history on their side it is hosts Sri Lanka and India that are the bookies' favourites.

It is widely expected to be Indian batsmen Sachin Tendulkar's last World Cup. The 37 year old has scored 46 hundreds in his one day international career, 17 ahead of second placed man, Australian captain Ricky Ponting. This could see the price of game-used memorabilia by the Little Master increase substantially over the coming years.


Herschelle Gibbs: a fan of Dutch bowling

One of the most notable moments of the last World Cup was the six sixes scored in an over by South African batsman Herschelle Gibbs off the bowling of hapless Dutchman Daan van Bunge.

The signed bat used by Gibbs for the over and the signed shirts worn by the two players sold for £1,620 at Bonhams earlier this month.  

It was the first time this feat had ever been achieved in a World Cup match and would make the ball used for the over a valuable item of sports memorabilia were it to ever come to auction.

A ball used in Gary Sobers' similar feat in a county match sold at Christie's for £26,400 in 2006, just one of many fascinating cricket sales to have occurred.

 

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  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • andCaughtCollectorssold!