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  • 19th century cotton gin to auction with $10,000 minimum bid
  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • 19thcenturycottongin

19th century cotton gin to auction with $10,000 minimum bid

An early 19th century cotton gin will cross the block at Heritage Auctions in Dallas with a minimum bid of $10,000.

The lot is set to headline the Political and Americana Signature Auction on November 8.

cotton gin Heritage
The cotton gin extended the suffering of slaves in the 19th century

Eli Whitney's 1794 invention revolutionised the cotton industry in the southern states of the US, but extended the suffering of slaves.

The number of indentured slaves had been in decline towards the end of the 18th century. However, with the gin providing the ability to create hundreds of pounds of cotton in a relatively short space of time, suddenly slavery was viable again.

The present lot is one of very few surviving gins, resulting in it achieving $76,000 when it last sold, at Slotin Folk Art Auction in 2004.

It's likely to be a knock-off version of Whitney's design, as it differs subtly from his original plans.

Frank Lloyd-Wright's blueprints for Fallingwater carry an opening bid of $6,000.

The house is among the architect's most recognisable designs and was built in rural Pennsylvania for a Pittsburgh department store owner.

The lot is accompanied by a cheque signed by Lloyd-Wright.

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  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • 19thcenturycottongin