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  • Time stands still for Skinner Inc's brilliant antique clock sale
  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • forstandsstillTime

Time stands still for Skinner Inc's brilliant antique clock sale

 

 

A brilliant collection of timepieces is going under the hammer later this month, on Saturday July 16, at American auction house Skinner, Inc.

Featuring a wide array of antique clocks and pocket watches, many of these items on sale are exquisitely made and also very rare. Without out a shadow of a doubt, the standout lot is the 90 day wall regulator clock, made in 1858 by Boston based manufacturer E. Howard and Co.

 


Classic and elegant, this wonderful clock should make more than $100,000

It is made from walnut and contains Henry C. Fay's patented escapement, and is listed as the only known 90 day duration wall clock. Its rarity and undoubted high quality means it is valued at a strong price of $80,000-120,000.

Equally as impressive, though made in a contrasting style, is the Charles Fasoldt table regulator, created in 1870 in Albany, New York. As opposed to the 1858 clock above, this one is made in a much more minimalist style, stripping away the excess to reveal only the workings of the clock.

 


Much more raw and minimalist, but still brilliant, is this Charles Fasoldt clock

It is a simple and unapologetic piece, designed for one purpose only. It would surely delight any clock or watch collector to won such a fine piece, which has been given a an estimate of between $80,000-100,000.

Valued at a significantly smaller amount at $15,000-25,000, though arguably just as fine an object as the two above, is this magnificent Curtis and Clark Spring-powered shelf clock. Produced in 1825, only around 200 of them were thought to have been made, of which few survive today.

Not only is it rare and in superb condition, but it is also fabulously decorated, with its outer mahogany shell beautifully carved and an image on the front, something not seen very often. These unique features are sure to make it a valuable investment as its worth is only likely to increase.

 

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  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • forstandsstillTime