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  • US 1857 10c block at auction for $15,000 this month
  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • 10c1857blockUS

US 1857 10c block at auction for $15,000 this month

An upcoming major philatelic auction will see a block of four 10c stamps from the 1857 issue lead its US section on August 23-25.

1857 10-cent stamp block of four US
The 1857 issue was the first in US postal history to feature perforations


The block features a combination of Type II and Type III stamps from the renowned issue in positions 62-63 and 72-73L1. With lightly hinged original gum and boasting a vibrant green colouration, it is expected to bring between $10,000 and $15,000 at auction.

It was mid-way through 1857 that the decision was taken to transform the design of America's classic stamps series with a brand new addition - perforations. Eight major types of the resulting stamps were initially issued, according to the Scott Catalogue, with this block coming from Plate 2, which contains Type II, Type III and Type IIIA.

Also featuring in the sale will be a Baltimore, MD 5c Postmaster Provisional, which is estimated at $7,500-10,000. Including the unique signature of postmaster James M Buchanan, the bluish paper cover is much scarcer than the 5c examples on white paper and stands as one of just two known examples.

Among the modern stamps on offer is a 1962 4c Winslow Homer pair, which is lacking the vertical imperforation between the stamps. An original gum, never hinged example of the major rarity in immaculate condition, it will sell with another $7,500-10,000 estimate.

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  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • 10c1857blockUS