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  • Neil Armstrong’s autograph: A rising star
  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • autographNeil ArmstrongSpace

Neil Armstrong’s autograph: A rising star

Neil Armstrong’s autograph is popular with buyers all over the world.  

But what keeps values rising year on year? 

Here are a few thoughts... 

Neil shunned the limelight 

Neil Armstrong was always low key.  

He disliked being the centre of attention. 

Neil Armstrong autograph

(Image: Wikimedia Commons)

So, after the Moon Landing...

The world tours and ticker tape parades and TV interviews... 

He quietly retired from NASA in 1971 and went off to teach engineering at the University of Cincinnati.  

While he wasn’t a total recluse, he rarely appeared in public again.  

But he was generous with his signature.  

Generally, he would give them out to all those who asked them.  

Until 1993 

Armstrong was annoyed to learn there was a market for his autograph.  

Neil Armstrong autograph

(Image: Wikimedia Commons)

This was during the earliest years of the internet.  

And much of the trade was online.  

So, in 1993, he stopped signing for people who asked him.  

That effectively capped the number on the market in the years leading up to his death in 2012.  

All of the Apollo 11 astronauts signed relatively high numbers of autographs.  

In fact, many were used as a kind of insurance for the nascent Apollo programme – to be sold to benefit their families in the likely event of tragedy.  

But that has no impact on prices.  

Because demand is enormous 

Millions of people worldwide want a Neil Armstrong autograph.  

Some are collectors. 

Neil Armstrong autograph

(Image: Wikimedia Commons)

Other simply admire his extraordinary achievement.  

And that means that while Armstrong signed plenty of autographs, it will never be enough.  

Demand massively outstrips supply.  

Prices have risen an average of 16.8% per annum since 2000.  

Today you can expect to pay close to £9,000 ($11,800) for a signed photo.  

Armstrong’s status as a pioneer makes him a superb investment.  

You can be sure we’ll still be talking about him 100 years from now.  

Paul Fraser.  

PS. I have a great selection of Neil Armstrong autographs for sale. Click here to take a look.  

  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • autographNeil ArmstrongSpace