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  • Native American signed treaty makes $57,500 in Maine auction
  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • AmericanNativesignedtreaty

Native American signed treaty makes $57,500 in Maine auction

A Native American treaty headlined a sale at Thomaston Place Auction Galleries in Maine, selling for $57,500 on August 23-24.

The Canajoharie Patent Treaty was signed in upstate New York on May 27, 1766. It was drawn up by George and Jacob Klock and John Van Sice in the village (now a town) of the same name that stands on the banks of the Mohawk river in Montgomery County.

Native American Treaty
George Klock allegedly plied the Mohawks with rum for three days prior to the signing

George Klock is reported to have been a shady character who ran a local tavern that catered to the Native Americans - leading to inevitable tension between the communities.

Eventually he was forced to close it under pressure from Joseph Brant, also known as Thayendanegea, an important figure in the Mohawk community.

Brant (1743-1807) had studied at Moor's Indian Charity School (which would later become Dartmouth College) where he was described by his teacher, Eleazar Wheelock, as being "of a sprightly genius, a manly and gentle deportment, and of a modest, courteous and benevolent temper."

He would go on to play a major role in the American Revolution, fighting on the side of the British.

Despite Brant's influence, Klock still managed to squeeze a good deal out of the Native Americans, paying just ?�600 for a significant portion of land with a lease period of 9,900 years.

The tribe were also allotted one ear of corn every October.

It is alleged that Klock locked the tribal leaders in a hut and plied them with rum for three days before bringing out the treaty.

We have this genuine strand of hair from legendary Apache leader Geronimo.

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  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • AmericanNativesignedtreaty