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  • Abraham Lincoln's Illinois desk to sell for $150,000 at PIH
  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • AbrahamdeskIllinoisLincoln's

Abraham Lincoln's Illinois desk to sell for $150,000 at PIH

The desk that Abraham Lincoln used during his terms in the Illinois House of Representatives is one of the major highlights of Profiles in History's Historical Auction 72, to be held on December 16 in California.

Abraham Lincoln desk
Lincoln served four successive terms in Illinois before being elected to Congress



Constructed of yellow walnut wood, the desk is an important relic from Lincoln's early career. He was a Whig representative in Illinois for four successive terms, having been successful on his second run for office.

With provenance dating back to the 19th century, the desk is accompanied in the sale by an archive of letters and correspondence attesting to its authenticity.

It is expected to sell for $100,000-150,000.

The highest bids in the sale are expected from a draft for a scientific paper by Albert Einstein, valued at $120,000-180,000.

Created circa 1930, the pages detail Einstein's development of his unified field theory, and are a fantastic insight into his working life, with annotations and "cheat sheets" included.

Also starring is a letter that highlights Thomas Jefferson's incredible creativity as a leader of the Enlightenment. Hailing from the days when he famously designed his home, Monticello, the letter sees him reinventing the Rumford fireplace.

Featuring architectural drawings as well as Jefferson's instructions to the builder, the letter is estimated to sell for $60,000-80,000.

Paul Fraser Collectibles has a superb range of autograph letters for sale, including a great example from Einstein.


  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • AbrahamdeskIllinoisLincoln's