Arrow Fat Left Icon Arrow Fat Right Icon Arrow Right Icon Cart Icon Close Circle Icon Expand Arrows Icon Facebook Icon Pinterest Icon Twitter Icon Youtube Icon Hamburger Icon Information Icon Down Arrow Icon Mail Icon Mini Cart Icon Person Icon Ruler Icon Search Icon Shirt Icon Triangle Icon Bag Icon Play Video
  • Our Top Five entry-level Classic Car investments
  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • entry-levelFiveOurTop

Our Top Five entry-level Classic Car investments

There are few better ways to enjoy the summer than behind the wheel of a classic car.

Here, we take a look at some great appreciating investments which can be found on the collectors' markets - and bring together five rolling works of art that offer you passion, pleasure and profit...

#5 Jaguar XJ-S - £2,000-5,000

The sleek and classic XJ-S is perfect for summer day trips to the local pub, and is fast catching up with its E-Type predecessor in the investibility and style stakes.


The Jaguar XJ-S 

Intended as a replacement for the E-Type, the XJ-S was based on XJ6 chassis and offered a more sedate, Grand Tourer drive in comparison to the sportier E-Type, combined with over-light power assisted steering.

The XJ-S remained in production for 20 years, longer than any other Jag, until 1996. Average to excellent models can be bought for as little as £2,000, with healthy value appreciations shown in recent market and auction prices.

#4 Alfa Romeo Spider 2000 S1/S2 - £7,250-8,750

The Spider's delicate stylings and sophisticated engineering made it the polar opposite of its no-nonsense British counterparts. Alfa Romeo couldn't leave its cars alone in the 1960s-70s - and today collectors can buy the robust 2.0 litre model, produced between 1969-82, for less than £10,000.


The Alfa Romeo Spider 2000

Its Pininfarina stylings were left untouched until the 1970 restyle which lengthened the body and added a lustier 2000cc twin-cam engine. Collectors should avoid examples with ripples in the bodywork or paint, and make sure the car's ownership and service history is fully documented.

#3 Datsun 240Z - £9,000-11,000

Today regarded by many as the world's best sports line, it all began here with the Datsun 240Z which was produced between 1969-78.


The Datsun 240Z

With its spot-on Monocoque bodywork styled by Albrecht Goertz, powerful 161bhp performance from its rorty straight-six engine and noted reputation for reliability, the Datsun 240Z was for many years the best-selling sportscar in the world.

Over 150,000 examples were made during the car's five-year production run. Good to excellent 240Z's can be bought for £9,000-11,000, and values are seriously appreciating.

#2 MGB Roadster - £9,000-11,250

For some, the MGB Roadster with a convertible hood is the ideal summer classic automobile. Indeed, in its 1960s heyday the MGB was the world's best-selling car until the arrival of the Datsun 240Z.


The MGB Roadster

Contemporary specs under the bonnet made the MGB a delight to drive, with plenty of power on-tap thanks to its 1.8 litre B-series engine. Examples can be bought for as little as £9,000 in good condition, or around £11,250 in excellent condition.

Check that the bodywork is straight and rust-free - and it's best to invest in a pre-1973 chrome bumper model. The later rubber bumpered versions were modified to meet North American regulations, and vilified by MGB fans at the time.

#1 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow - £11,000-14,000

Produced between 1965-80, this refined cruiser was intended as a Rolls-Royce for the masses; who unitary construction, all-round disc brakes and self-levelling suspension were revolutionary for the company.


The Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow

Beneath a classic mix of classic and then-contemporary car design, the original 6230cc V8 engine rose to a 6750cc in 1970 - although, by 1977, the car had fallen victim to rubber bumpers and a front air dam.

With 'good' models on the market for £11,000, the Silver Shadow is an excellent opportunity for entry-level investors to enjoy Rolls-Royce's upper class air.

Bear in mind that the later 6.75-litre version is a gas-guzzler with potentially large running costs. Also avoid examples with straight or spotted bodywork, which can lead to crippling bills.

  • Post author
    Paul Fraser
  • entry-levelFiveOurTop